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The satisfaction which he seeks after, you say is to be had; and you tell us the mine where you think it is not to be found.

Now I shall not easily be persuaded that you are so rash, and take up your opinions so lightly, as to advance or even to imagine this ; unless you had first searched that mine yourself, imd formed a conjecture at least concerning the place where you suppose this knowledge is to be found.

In- stead therefore of making me display to Mr. With all my heart, if you chuse it should be so, and think you shall have patience to hear me through.

I own I pcefer instruction to correction, and had rather have been informed without the hazard of exposing myself; but if you make the one a condition of the other, I think it still worth my acceptance; and will not lose this opportunity of your judgment for a little shame.

I own therefore I long since formed to myself a kind of system, which seemed to me of singular use in the very small extent of my younger studies to keep my mind from confusion and the imposition of words.

I afterwards found it equally useful to me with some of the dead languages. After an- other interval therefore not of idleness and pleasure I was again called by the questions of our friend Mr.

Besides, I did not atall suspect that my notions, if just, could be peculiar to myself: and I hoped to find some author who might give him a clearer, fuller, and more metho- dical account than I could, free from those errors and omissions to which I must be liable.

Having therefore some small intervals of leisure, and a great desire to give him the best information ; I confess I have em- ployed some part of that leisure in reading every thing I could easily and readily procure that has been sug- gested by others.

For, though in many respects it has been and is to this moment grossly mistaken, and the mistakes might, with the help of some of the first principles of natural philosophy and anatomy, be easily corrected, yet it is an inquiry more of curiosity than immediate usefulness.

Whose system of philosophy will you build upon? What you say is true. And yet I shall not begin there. Begin then as you please.

Only begin. Digitized by Google Digitized by Google EEEA ETEPOENTA, PART I. CHAPTER I. You do not mention this, I hope, as something new, or wherein you differ from others?

You are too hasty with me. But I mention it as that principle, which, being kept singly in contem-r plation, has misled all those who have reasoned on this subject.

Is it not true then? I think it is. And that on which the whole matter rests. And yet the confining themselves to this true prin- ciple, upon which the whole matter rests, has misled them!

Indeed I think so. This is curious! The earliest inquirers into langruage proceeded then to settle how many sorts there were of things ; and from thence how many sorts of words, or parts of speech.

Scaliger de Caum L. Digitized by Google CH. At most three, or four. But there are two sorts of things : 1. Res qtuz permanent. Res quiBJiuunt. There must therefore be two sorts of words or parts offfeech: viz.

Nbta rerum qua permanent. Nota rerum qtuejluunt. Well ; but surely there are words which are neither noi E rerum permanentium, nor yet nota rerum Jluen- tium.

What will you do with them? Here concluded the search after the different sorts of words, or parts of speech, from the difference of things : for none other apparently rational, acknow- ledged, or accepted difference has been suggested.

According to this system, it was necessary that all sorts of words should belong to one of these four ticularly bj Girard, Dangeau, the authors of the Encychpedie, 8cc.

In which it is siogular that they should all be right in their arguments against the use made of it by others ; and all wrong, in the use which each of them would make of it himself.

Johnson adopts N. And there being no more than four differences of things, there could be but four parts of speech.

The difficulty and controversy now was, to determine to which of these four classes each word belonged. In the attempt- ing of which, succeeding Grammarians could neither satisfy themselves nor others : for they soon discover- ed some words so stubborn, that no sophistry nor vio- lence could by any means reduce them to any one of these classes.

However, by this attempt and dispute they became better acquainted with the differences of words, though they could not account for them ; and they found the old system deficient, though they knew not how to supply its defects.

They seem therefore to have reversed the method of proceeding from things to signs, pursued by the philosophers ; and, still allow- ing the principle, viz.

Misled there- fore by the useful contrivances of language, they sup- posed many imaginary differences of things : and thus added greatly to the number of parts of speech, and in consequence to the errors of philosophy.

Add to this, that the greater and more laborious part of Grammarians to whose genius it is always more obvious to remark a multitude of effects than to Digitized by Google 22 OF THE DIVISION OR [PAAT I.

From this time the number of parts of speech has been variously reckoned : you will find different Gram- marians contending for more than thirty.

But most of those who admitted the fewest, acknowledged eight This was long a favourite number ; and has been kept to by many who yet did not include the same parts to make up that number.

For those, who rejected the article reckoned eight: and those who did not allow the interjection still reckoned eight But what sort of difference in words should intitle them to hold a sepa- rate rank by themselves, has not to this moment been settled.

You seem to forget, that it is some time since words have beep no longer allowed to be the signs of things. And this has made a great alteration in the manner of accounting for the differences of words.

Digitized by Google CU. That has not much mended the matter. No doubt this alteration approached so far nearer to the truth ; but the nature of Language has not been much better understood by it.

For Grammarians have since pur- sued just the same method with mindy as had before been done with things.

So that the very same game has been played over again with ideaf, which was before played with things. No satisfaction, DO agreement has been obtained : But all has been' dispute, diversity, and darkness.

Insomuch that many of the most learned and judicious Grammarians, dis- gusted with absurdity and contradictions, have pru- dently contented themselves with remarking the dif- ferences of words, and have left the causes of language to shift for themselves, B.

That the methods of accounting for Language re- main to this day various, uncertain, and unsatisfactory, cannot be denied.

But you have said nothing yet to clear up the paradox you set out with ; nor a single word to unfold to us by what means you suppose Hennes has blinded Philosophy.

Digitized by Google 24 OF THE DIVISION OR [PART I. I imagine that it is, in some measure, with the vehi- cle of our thoughts, as with the vehicles for our bodies.

Necessity produced both. The first carriage for men was no doubt invented to transport the bodies of those who from infirmity, or otherwise, could not move them- selves : But should any one, desirous of understanding the purpose and meaning of all the parts of our modem elegant carriages, attempt to explain them upon this one principle alone, viz.

Abbreviations are the wheels of language, the wings of Mercury. And though we might be dragged along without them, it would be with much difficulty, very heavily and tediously.

There is nothing more admirable nor more useful than the invention of signs : at the same time there is nothing more productive of error when we neglect to observe their complication.

If they were very laborious and very learned indeed, it is likely they would write as many volumes on the subject, and with as much bitterness against each other, as Grammarians have done from the same sort of mistake concerning Language : until perhaps it should be suggested to them, that there may be not only signs of sounds ; but again, for the sake of abbreviation, signs of those signs, one under another in a continued progression.

Episi, Dedicatory. In the Courier de P Europe, No. I think I begin to comprehend you. And that these are the artificial wings of Mercury, by means of which the Argus eyes of philosophy have been cheated.

It is my meaning. We can only judge of your opinion after we have heard how you maintain it. Proceed, and strip him of his wings. They seem easy enough to be taken off: for it strikes me now, after what you have said, that they are indeed put on in a peculiar manner, and do not, like those of other winged deities, make a part of his body.

You have only to loose the strings from his feet, and take off his cap. Come — Let us see what sort of figure he will make without them.

The first aim of Language was to communicate our thoughts : the second, to do it with dispatch, I mean Digitized by Google CH.

Words have been called winged: and they well deserve that name, when their abbreviations are compared with the progress which speech could make without these inventions ; but com- pared with the rapidity of thought, they have not the smallest claim to that title.

Philosophers have calcula- ted the difference of velocity between sound and light ; But who will attempt to calculate the difference be- tween speech and thought!

Le President de Brosses, in his excellent treatise De la formation mechanique des Langues, torn. Le plus grand avantage d'une langue est d'etre claire.

Tous les precedes de Grammaire ne devroient aUer qu'k ce but. Pour le vulgaire, he should have added— et promptement. S'il n'a pas Tinstrument qu'il faudroit employer, il se sert de celui qu'il a tout prAt.

Abbreviations are employed in language three ways : 1. In terms. In sorts of words. In construction. The second only I take for my province at present ; because I believe it has hitherto escaped the proper notice of all.

Digitized by Google EHEA nXEPOENTA, CHAPTER LOCKE's ESS AT. I CANNOT recollect one word of Mr. Locke's that corresponds at all with any thing that you have said.

The third Book of his Essay is indeed expressly writ- ten — " On the Naturcy Use and Signification of Lan- guage. I consider the whok of Mr.

Locke's Essay as a phi- losophical account of the Jirst sort of abbreviations in Language. And it is 'very strange he should so have ima- gined t- But what immediately follows?

Lpcke made when be called his book, An Essay on Human Understanding. Scaliger de Causis. And though it terminated in things, yet it was for the most part so much by the intervention of words, that they- seemed scarce separable from our general know- ledge.

Locke in his Essay never did ad- vance one step beyond the origin of Ideas and the composition of Terms.

Dedicate Digitized by Google CH. And therefore he wrote the third Book of his Essay, on — " the Nature, Use, and Signification of Language.

If he had been aware of this sooner, that is, before he had treated of what he calls the origin and com- position of Ideas ; I think it would have made a great difference in his Essay.

And therefore I said, Mr. Locke 8 Essay Is the best Guide to the first sort of Abbreviations. I think he would have set out just as he did, with the origin of Ideas ; the proper starting-post of VOL.

Est enim quad rerum speculum intellectus noster ; cut, nist per sensum represententur res, nihil scit ipse. C Scaliger de Causis L. Dove il prin. Locke's essay.

What difference then do you imagine it would have- made in Mr. Rowland Jones agrees with his countryman, Sir Hugh Evans.

It saves the philosopher much trouble ; but leaves mankind in great ignorance, and leads to great error. I think too that he would have seen the advantage of " thoroughly weighing" not only as he says " the im- perfections of Language ;" but ita perfections also : For the perfections of Language, not properly understood, have been one of the chief causes of the imperfections of our philosophy.

Locke seems to me to have suspected something of this sort : and especially from what he hints in his last chapter ; where, speak- ing of the doctrine of signs, he says — " The conside- ration then of Ideas and Words, as the great instru- ments of knowledge, makes no despicable part of their contemplation who would take a view of human know- ledge in the whole extent of it.

And perhaps, if they were distinctly weighed and duly considered, they wbuld aflford us another sort of Logick and Critick than what we have hitherto been acquainted with.

Do not you think that what you now advance will bear a dispute : and that some better arguments than your bare assertion are necessary to make us adopt your opinion?

To many persons much more would be ne? And if that shall upon strict ex- amination appear to you to be the case, you will need no other argument against the composition of ideas : It being exactly similar to that unanswerable one which Mr.

Locke himself declares to be sufficient against their being innate. For the supposition is unnecessary : Every purpose for which the composition of Ideas was imagined being more easily and naturally answered by the composition of Terms : whilst at the same time it does likewise clear up many difficulties in which the supposed composition of Ideas necessarily involves us.

And, though this is the only argument I mean to use at present, because I would not willingly digress too far, and it is not the necessary foundation for what I have undertaken, yet I will venture to say, that it is an easy matter, upon Mr.

Locke's own principles and a physical consideration of the Senses and the Mind, to prove the impossibility of the composition of Ideas.

But, pray, let me ask you ; If so, what has Mr, Locke done in the Third Book of his Essay ; in which he professedly treats of the nature, use, and signification of Language?

He has really done little else but enlarge upon what he had said before, when he thought he was treating only of Ideas : that is, he has continued to treat of the composition of Terms.

The only Division Mr. This division is not made regularly and formally ; but is reserved to his seventh Chapter.

And even there it is done in a very cautious, doubting, loose, uncertain manner, very different from that incomparable author's usual method of proceeding.

Molyneux, that — " Some parts of that Third Book concerning Words, though the thoughts were easy and clear enough, yet cost him more pains to express than all the rest of his Essay.

And that therefore he should not much wonder if there were in some parts of it ob- scurity and doubtfulness. Digitized by Google 40 SOME CONSI0KRATION [PARTl.

How is this to be accounted for? Do you suppose he was unacquainted with the opinions of Grammarians, or that he despised the subject?

No : I am very sure of the contrary- For it is plain he did not despise the subject; since he repeatedly and strongly recommends it to others : and at every step throughout his Essay, I find the most evident marks of the journey he had himself taken through all their works.

But it appears that he was by no means satisfied with what he found there concerning Particles : For he complins that " this part of Grammar has been as much neglected, as some others over-diligently cul- tivated.

Of these there are a great variety, much exceeding the number of Particles. But though he declined the subject, he evidently leaned towards the opinion of Aristotle, Scaliger, and Mess, de Port Royal : and therefore, without having sufficiently examined their position, he too hastily adopted their notion concerning the pretended Copula Digitized by Google 42 jof MR.

Locke's jessay. Though, if the different sorts of Words had been as he was willing to believe to be accounted for by the different operations of the Mind, it was almost impos- 4S ible they should have escaped the penetrating eyes of Mr.

Digitized by Google EnEA nTEPOENTA, CHAPTER III. OF THE PARTS OF SPEECH. You said some time ago, very truly, that the number of Parts of Speech was variously reckoned : and that it has not to this moment been settled, what sort of difference in words should entitle them to hold a sepa- rate rank by themselves.

Now I cannot for my life imagine any other principle that you have left to conduct us to the Parts of Speech. I thought I had laid down in the beginning, the Digitized by Google 44 OF THE PARTS OF SPEECH.

Which do you mean? The same which Mr. Locke employs in his inquiry into the Force of words : viz. And to what distribution do they lead you?

To words necessary for the communication of our Thoughts. And 2. How many of each do you reckon? And which are they? In what particular language do you mean?

For, if you do not confine your question, you might as rea- sonably expect me according to the fable " to make a coat to fit the moon in all her changes.

Are they not the same in all languages? Those necessary to the communication of our thoughts are. And are not the others also? Very different. I thought we were talking of Universal Grammar.

I mean so too. But I cannot answer the whole of your question, unless you confine it to some particular language with which I am acquainted. However, that need not disturb you : for you will find afterwards that the principles will apply universally.

For the present then confine yourself to the necessary Parts : and exemplify in the English. In English, and in all Languages, there are only two sorts of words which are necessary for the commu- nication of our thoughts.

Digitized by Google 46 OF THE PARTS OF SPEECH. And they are? Noun, and 2. Verb, B- These are the common names, and I suppose you use them according to the common acceptation.

I should not otherwise have chosen them, but because they are commonly employed ; and it would not be easy to dispossess them of their prescriptive title : be- sides, without doing any mischief, it saves time in our discourse.

And I use them according to their common acceptation. But you have not all this while informed me how many Parts of Speech you mean to lay down.

That shall be as you please. Either TtvOy or Twenty, or more. In the strict sense of the term, no doubt both the necessary Words and the Abbreviations are all of them Parts of Speech ; because they are all useful in Digitized by Google CH.

But X think it of great consequence both Uf knowledge and to Languages, to keep the words em- ployed for the different purposes of speech, as distinct as possible.

Merely Substitutes! You do not mean that you can discourse as well without as with them? Not as well. A sledge cannot be drawn along as smoothly, and easily, and swiftly, as a carriage with wheels ; but it may be dragged.

Do you mean then that, without using any other sort of word whatever, and merely by the means of the Noun and Verb alone, you can relate or communicate any thing that I can relate or communicate with the help of all the others?

It is the great proof of all I have advanced. Scalier de Causis L. Digitized by Google 48 OF THE PARTS OF SPEECH. But, after the long habit and familiar use of AbbreviationSj your first attempts to do without them will seem very awkward to you ; and you will stumble as often as a horse, long used to be shod, that has newly cast his shoes.

All their other comparative advantages are trifling. I like your method of proof very well ; and will certainly put it to the trial.

But before I can do that properly, you must explain your Abbreviations ; that I may know what they stand for, and what words to put in their room.

Would you have me then pass over the two neces- sary Parts of Speech ; and proceed immediately to their Abbreviations? If you will.

For I suppose you agree with the com- Digitized by Google CH. Those you call necessary, I suppose you allow to be the signs of different sorts of Ideas, or of different operations of the mind.

Indeed I do not. The business of the mind, as far as it concerns Language, appears to me to be very simple.

It extends no further than to receive impres- sions, that is, to have Sensations or Feelings. What are called its operations, are merely the operations of Lan- guage.

A consideration of Ideas, or of the Mind, or of Things relative to the Parts of Speech , will lead us no further than to Nouns : i. The other Part of Speech, the Verb, must be accounted for from the necessary use of it in communication.

It is in fact the communication itself: and therefore well denomi- nated Pi7f6a, Dictum. Let us proceed then regularly ; and hear what you have to say on each of your two necessary Parts of Speech.

E Digitized by Google Digitized by Google EHEA nTEPOENTA, CHAPTER IV. OF THE NOUN. I shall only remind you, that at this stage of our in- quiry concerning Language, comes in most properly the consideration of the force of Terms : which is the whole business of Mr.

Locke's Essay ; to which I re- fer you. And I imagine that Mr. Locke's intention of confining himself to the consideration of the Mind only, was the reason that he went no further dian to the Force of Terms ; and did not meddle with their Manner of signification, to which the Mind alone could never lead him.

Do you say nothing of the Declension, Number, Case and Gender of Nouns? At present nothing. There is no pains-worthy diffi- culty nor dispute about them.

Surely there is about the Gender. And Mr. What think you of that part of his book? That, with the rest of it, he had much better have let it alone.

Agens, Mas ; PatienSf TcRuxmh. Quapropter Deusdicunt masculine; TVrra, fofniDine : et Ignis, masculine ; et Jqua, foeminine : quoniam in his Actio, in istis Pauio relucebat.

Genus est modus significandi nominis sumptus a proprietate activa vel passiva. Peachum say of her own sex in cases of murder are bitter bad judges in mat- ters of philosophy.

Besides that Reason is an arrant Despot ; who, in his own dominions, admits of no au- thority but his own. Harris is particularly unfortunate in the very outset of that — " subtle kind of reasoning as he calls it which discerns even in things without sex, a distant analogy to that great na- tural distinction.

For Mr. Harris ought to have bown, that in many Asiatic Languages, and in all the northern Languages of this part of the globe which we inhabit, and particularly in our Mother-language the Anglo-Saxon from which sun and moon are im- mediately derived to us , suN is Femininey and moon is Masculine f.

Mona autem permanis su- perioribus Mofi, alias Man ; a Mofiy alias Man veterrimo ipso- Digitized by Google 64 OF THE NOUN. Figure apart, in our Language, the names of things without sex are also without gender f- And this, not because our Reasoning or Understanding differs from rum rege et Deo patrio, quern Tacitus meminit, et in Luna cele- brabant.

Dicunt enim Die Sunn, non Der Sunn. Unde et Solem Tuiscqnis uzoreiu fuisse fabulantur," — G. Sed ab usu hoc factum est ; qui i Digitized by Google CH.

Scalier de Causis, cap. Alterum argumentum est ex lis que Dubia sive Incerta vocant. Sic enim dictum est.

Hie vel Hmc Dies. Tertium testimonium est in quibusdam : nam Plautus Colium masculine dixit. On ditau masculin Un ComtCp Un Duche ; et au feminin Vne Comte pairie, Une Duchipairie.

On dit encore De bonnes gens, et Des gens malheureux. The ingenious author of — Notes on the Grammatica Sinica of Jf.

How could Frenchmen for- get that in their own la meilleure des langues possibles. Fruit- trees are masculine and their fruits feminine i Mr.

Harris has adopted this idea : he might as well have left it to its legitimate parentF. This contrivance of theirs, allowing them a more varied construction, made the terminating gen- ders of Adjectives useful, in order to avoid mistake and misapplication.

At Poetse et Pictores in coloribus non aemper conveniunt. Digitized by Google EnEA nTEPOENTA, CHAPTER V.

The fate of this very necessary word has been most singular- ly hard and unfortunate. But though the Article is denied by many Grammarians to be a Part of Speech ; it is yet, as you say, treated of by many, separately from those parts which they allow.

As far as respects the Article I think you are right But why such bitterness against the Interjection? Why do you not rather follow Buonmattei's example ; and, instead of excluding both, admit them both to be Parts of Speech?

Because the dominion of Speech is erected upon the downfell of Interjections. Si vero Daturales, non sunt partes orationis. Valla inteijectionem a pdrtibus ora- ticmis rejicit.

Ma questa h parte spettante a chi pronunzia, che sappio dar loro Fac- ceoto di quell' aflfetto cui servono ; e sono d' esclamazione. But where Speech can be employed, they are totally useless ; and are al- ways insufficient for the purpose of communicating our thoughts.

And indeed where will you look for the In- terjection? Will you find it amongst laws, or in books of civil institutions, in history, or in any treatise of useful arts or sciences?

You must seek for it in rhetorick and poetry, in novels, plays and romances. If what you say is true, I must acknowledge that the Article has had hard measure to be displaced for the Interjection.

For by your declamation, and the zeal di sospirare. And I do not wonder that, keeping his eyes solely on the superflu- ous use or rather abuse of it.

Say you so! Without any injury to the meaning of the passage, the article might have been omitted here by Condillac, twelve or thirteen times.

And when you have given me satisfaction on those points, you will permit me to ask you a few questions further. You may learn its necessity, if you please, from Mr.

And that once proved, it follows of conse- quence that I must deny its absence from the Latin or from any other language f.

Scaligerde Causis L. Fourmontf p. C'est VOL. Notwithstanding which he has sufficiently proved its necessity ; and conducted us directly to its use and purpose.

For in the eleventh chapter of the second book of his Essay, sect 9, he says, — "The use of words being to stand as outward marks of our internal ideas, and those ideas being taken from particular things ; if every particular idea should have a distinct name, names would be endless.

But yet we find the quite contrary. The far greatest part of words that make all languages, are General Terms. Which has not been the effect of neglect, or chance, but of reason and necessity.

Umverselle, p. For the signification and use of words depending on that connexion which the mind makes between its ideas and the sounds it uses as signs of them ; it is necessary, in the applica- tion of names to things, that the mind should have di- stinct ideas of the things, and retain also the peculiar name that belongs to every one, with its peculiar ap- propriation to that idea.

We may therefore easily find a reason why men have never attempted to give names to each sheep in their flock, or crow that flies over their heads ; much less to call every leaf of plants or grain of sand that came in their way by a peculiar name.

Men would in vain heap up names of par- ticular things, that would not serve them to communi- cate their thoughts.

Men learn names, and use them in talk with others, only that they may be understood ; which is then only done, when by use or consent, the sound I make by the organs of speech excites in an- other man's mind who hears it, the idea I apply to it in mine when I speak it.

This cannot be done by names applied to particular things, whereof I alone having the ideas in my mind, the names of them could not be significant or intelligible to another who was not ac- quainted with all those very particular things which had fallen under my notice.

Universality belongs not to things themselves, which are all of them particular in their existence. When therefore we quit Particulars, the Generals that rest are only creatures of our own ma- king ; their general nature being nothing but the ca- pacity they are put into of signifying or representing many Particulars.

So that the Article also, in combination with a gene- ral temiy is merely a substitute. But fhen it differs from those substitutes which we have ranked under the general head of Abbreviations: because it is neces- sary for the communication of our thoughts, and sup- plies the place of words which are not in the language.

Whereas Abbreviations are not necessary for communi- cation ; and supply the place of words which are in the language.

And though he admits of only two Articles, " properly and strictly so called," viz. If Mr. Harris has not intirely secured my concur- rence with his Doctrine of Definitives, I must confess he has at least taken effectual care to place it compleatly beyond the reach of confutation.

He says, 1. However, " they supply its place. I will suppose Mr. Harris when one of the Lords of the Treasury to have addressed the Minister in the same style of reasoning.

Oblige me therefore by withdrawing my present scanty pittance ; and supply its place to me, by a negation of your salary. Harris would have felt by finding his theory thus reduced to practice, no person can better judge than myself ; because I have experienced a con- duct not much dissimilar from the Rulers of the Inner Temple : who having first inticed me to quit one pro- fession, after many years of expectation, have very handsomely supplied its place to me by a negation of the other.

IHE three following chapters except some small al- terations and additions have already been given to the public in A Letter to Mr.

Dunning in the year : which, though published, was not written on the spur of the occasion. Solicitor General Wedderburm — since Chancellor and a Peer.

Earl Mansfield, Chief Justice. Bulier — since a Judge. Wallace— since Attorney General. Mansfield— since Solicitor General and C.

Bearcroft— since Chief Justice of Chester. For mankind in general are not suf- ficiently aware that words without meaning, or of equi- vocal meaning, are the everlasting engines of fraud and injustice : and that the grimgribber of Westmin- ster-Hall is a more fertile, and a much more formida- ble, source of imposture than the abracadabra of ma- gicians.

None were however adduced, but by the Chief Justice himself; who indeed produced two. The King against Home. In the first place, that I left it exceedingly short : and the objec- tion to my having left it short, was simply this ; that I had stated no more to you but this, that of imputing to the conduct of the King's troops the crime of murder.

Now 1 stated it, as imptUed to the troops, ORDERED as they were upon the PUBLIC SER- VICE. What is it? Why it is this ; that our be- loved American Fellow-subjects— m REBELLION against the State — not beloved so as to be abetted in their REBELLION.

Why then what are they who gave the ORDERS i Draw the conclusion. I say, on the strength of these two precedents alone. This, however, I can truly tell his lordship ; that the other massacres that might be named , why then you may form a difierent conclusion.

Dunning, was not aware of the objection when I first mentioned it to him ; that he would not believe the information could be so defective in all its Counts, till I produced to him an Office Copy : when to his astonishment he found it sOy he felt no jealousy that the objection had been missed by himself; but declared it to be insu- perable and fatal : and bad me rest assured, that what- ever might be Lord Mansfield's wishes, and his courage on such occasions, he would not dare to overrule the objection.

And when after the close of the first day, I hinted to him my suspicions of Lord Mansfield's in- tentions by the " God forbid;" and by the perverted and misapplied " De bene esse,' in order to mix the proceedings on the trial with the question of record ; he smiled at it, as merely a method which his lordship took of letting the matter down gently, and breaking the abruptness of his fall.

Strange as it may appear! One of those Precedents was merely imagined by the Chief Justice, but never really existed.

And the other through ignorance of the meaning of the Conjunction that had never been truly understood ; neither by the Counsel who origi- nally took the exception, nor perhaps by the Judges who made the decision, nor by the Reporter of it, nor by the present Chief Justice who quoted and misap- plied it.

And I undertook, in that Letter to Mr. Dunning, to shew the real merits and foundation, and consequently Lord Mansfield's misapplication of the other.

And I undertook this, because it afforded a very striking instance of the importance of the mean- ing of words ; not only as has been too lightly sup- posed to Metaphysicians and School-men, but to the rights and happiness of mankind in their dearest con- cerns — the decisions of Courts of Justice.

In the House of Lords these two Precedents the foundation of the Judgment in the Court of King s Bench were abandoned : and the description of my crime against Government was adjudged to be suffi- ciently set forth by the Prepositions of and concern- ing.

Perhaps it may make my readers smile ; but I men- tion it as a further instance of the importance of in- quiry into the meaning of words ; — that in the decision of the Judges in the House of Lords, the Chief Justice De Grey who found of and concerning so compre- hensive, clear, and definite began by declaring that — " the word Certainty [which the Law requires in the description of Criines] is as indefinite [that is, as Uji- certain] as any word that could be used.

Civil, di Napoli. Digitized by Google Digitized by Google EHEA nXEPOENTA, CHAPTER VI. OF THE WORD THJtT.

The best rule to VOL. They do so. And by so doing, sufficiently instruct us if we will but use our common sense what value we ought to put upon such classes and such defini- tions.

Can you give us any general rule by which to di- stinguish when they are of the one sort, and when of the other? Let them give the rule who thus confound together the Manner of signification of words, and the Abbre- viations in their Construction: than which no two things in Language are more distinct, or ought to be more carefully distinguished.

I do not allow that Any words change their nature in this manner, so as to be- long sometimes to one Part of Speech, and sometimes to another, from the different ways of using them.

I never could perceive any such fluctuation in any word whatever : though I know it is a general charge brought erroneously against words of almost every denomina- distinguish them is this.

But it appears to me to be all. But I desire to wave this matter for the pre- sent; because I think it will be cleared up by what is to follow concerning the other sorts of words : at least, if that should not convince you, I shall be able more easily to satisfy you on this head hereafter.

I would not willingly put you out of your own way, and am contented to wait for the explanation of many things till you shall arrive at the place which you may think proper for it.

But really what you have now advanced seems to me so very extraordinary and con- trary to fact, as well as to the uniform declaration of all Grammarians, that you must excuse me, if, before we proceed any further, I mention to you one instance.

And so say all other grammarians. However I do not desire an explanation of that [point] : because I see how you will easily recon- cile that [difference], by a mhauditur or an abbpevia- tion of Construction : and I agree with you there.

But what will you do with the Conjunction that? Is not this a very considerable and manifest fluctua- tion and difference of signification in the same word?

Has the Conjunction that, any the smallest corre- spondence or similarity of signification with that, the Article, or Pronoun? In my opinion the word that call it as you please, either Article, or Pronoun, or Conjunction retains al- ways one and the same signification.

Unnoticed ab- breviation in construction and difference of position have caused this appearance of fluctuation ; and mis- led the Grammarians of all languages both antient and modem : for in all they make the same mistake.

Pray, answer me a question. Is it not strange and impro- per that we should, without any reason or necessity, employ in English the same word for two different meanings and purposes?

I think it wrong : and I see no reason for it, but many reasons against it Digitized by Google CH. If they do so, it is strange.

They certainly do; as you will easily find by in- quiry. Now does not the uniformity and universality of this supposed mistake, and unnecessary impropriety, in languages which have no connexion with each other, naturally lead us to suspect that this usage of the Ar- ticle may perhaps be neither mistaken nor improper?

But that the mistake may lie only with us, who do not understand it? No doubt what you have said, if true, would afford ground for suspicion.

If true! Examine any languages you please, and see whether they also, as well as the English, have Digitized by Google 86 or THE WORD THAT.

Does not this look as if there was some reason for employing the Article in this manner? And as if there was some connexion and similarity of signification between it and this Con- junction?

The appearances, I own, are strongly in favour of your opinion. But how shall we find out what that connexion is? Suppose we examine some instances; and, still keep- ing the same signification of the sentejices, try whether we cannot, by a resolution of their construction, disco- ver what we want.

You mean that we should never forget our situation, and that we should be prudent- ly contented to do good within our own sphere, where it can have an effect : and that we should not be mis- led even by a virtuous benevolence and public spirit, to waste ourselves in fruitless efforts beyond our power of influence.

We should never forget our situation ; you mean that : and we should be content- ed to do good within our own sphere where it can have an effect ; you mean that : and we should not be misled even by a virtuous benevolence and public spirit to waste ourselves in fruitless efforts beyond our power of influence ; you mean that.

Strange's Reports. Digitized by Google 88 of the word that. Digitized by Google ch. U leur accorde les six autres pour se procurer de quoi vivre.

Poivre at the condition of Siam, night serve as other exatnples for the Conjunction in question : Digitized by Google 90 OF THE WORD TBAT.

THAT or its equivalent is employed : and by such re- solution it will always be discovered to have merely the same force and signification, and to be in fact no- thing else but the very same word which in other places is called an Article or a Pronoun.

For any thing that immediately occurs to me, this may perhaps be the case in English, where that is the only Conjunction of the same signification which we employ in this manner.

But your last example makes me believe that this method of resolution will but I give them for the sake of their matter. And if so, I sus- pect that your whole reasoning on this subject may be without foundation.

For how can you resolve the original of your last example ; where unfortunately for your notion ut is employed, and not the neuter krikk QUOD?

You are not to expect from me that I should, in this place, account etjrmologically for the different words which some languages for there are others beside the originally written UTX is nothing but 6ri : So is QUOD an- ciently written QUODDE merely Kva 6tti.

The perpetual change of T into D, and vice versa, is so very fitmiliar to all who have ever paid the smallest attention to Lan- guage, that I should not think it worth while to notice it in the present instance ; if all tiie etymological canonists, whom I have seen, bad not been remarkably inattentive to the organical causes of those literal changes of which they treat.

But if you should hereafter exact it, I shall not refuse the under- taking : although it is not the easiest part of Etymo- logy : for Abbreviation and Corruption are always bur N.

For these seven couple of simple consonantSy viz. And for failing in this one point only, changes seven of our consonants : for we owe seven additional letters i.

Digitized by Google 94 OF THE WORD TBAT. Les mots qui reviennent le plus souvent dans les langues, tels que les verbes eire,faire, vouloir, iUler, et tous ceux qui serrent k lier les autres mots dans le discours, sont sujets k de plus grandes alterations.

You have extricated yourself pretty well out of this scrape with ut. CanMamenti delle Letiere, page 1 6. But I have not yet done with the English : for though your method of resolution will answer with most sentences, yet I doubt much whether it will with all.

I think there is one usage of the conjunction THAT which it will not explain. Produce an instance. The instances are common enough.

ScaU- ger. If that his feelings be the same with mine. I PRESUME my readers to be acquainted with French,, Latin, Italian and Greek ; which are unfortu- nately the usual boundaries of an English scholar's acquisition.

On this supposition, a friend of mine la- mented that, in my Letter to Mr. Dunning, I had not confined. Which will not seem at all extraordinary, when it is considered that the five last mentioned together with the English are little more than different dialects of one and the same language.

Because, in order to explain it, I must forestall something of what I had to say con- cerning Conjunctions. The truth of the matter is, that if is merely a Verb.

It is merely the Imperative of the Cxothic and Anglo- Saxon verb ri :AN, Gipin. And in those languages, as well as in the English formerly, this supposed Con- junction was pronounced and written as the common Imperative, purely n :, Cip, Gif.

And accordingly our corrupted if has always the signification of the English Imperative Give; and no other. So that the resolution of the construction in the instances you have produced, will be as before in the others.

For the resolution is — " She can be reclaimed, Give that ; my largesse hath lotted her to be your brother's mistresse.

She cannot be reclaimed, Give that; my largesse hath lotted her to be your brother's prey. As, — Example. But that. Unless that, Though that.

For I can by no means agree with the account which Dr. Johnson gives of it in his Dictionary : and I do not know that any other person has ever attempted to ex plain it.

How does he account for it? An honest mind and plain : he must speak Truth : An they will take it, — So, IF not; He's plain.

I can no more agree with Dr. Johnson than you do. Though even this account of it would serve my purpose.

But the truth will serve it better : and therefore I thank you for your difficulty. It is a fresh proof, and a very strong one in my favour, an is also a Verby and may very well supply the place of if ; it being nothing else but the Imperative of the Anglo-Saxon verb 3tnan, which like- wise means to Give, or to Grant.

It seems indeed to be so. But, if so, how can it ever be made to signify as if? It never signifies As if: nor is ever a contraction of them.

It will suit any thing. Johnson however advances Addison's authority for it. If Addison had so written, I should answer roundly, that he had written false English.

But he never did so write. He only quoted it in mirth and ridicule, ajs the author wrote it. And Johnson, an Editor of Shake- speare, ought to have known and observed it.

In English then, it seems, these two words which have been called conditional Conjunctions and whose force and manner of signification, as well as of all the others, we are directed by Mr.

Now let me understand you. But, as you have said that your principles will apply uni- versally, I desire to know whether you mean that the conditional corgunctions of all other languages are like- wise to be found, like if and an, in the original Im- peratives of some of their own or derived verbsy mean- ing to Givef H.

If that was my opinion, I know you are ready instantly to confute it by the Conditionals of the Greek and Latin and Irish, the French, Italian, Spanish, Por- tugueze and many other Languages.

But I mean, that those words which are called conditional cotyunctions, are to be accounted for in all languages in the same manner as I have accounted for if and an.

Harris and others distinguish from Prepositions, and call Conjunctions of Sentences. I deny them to be a separate sort of words or Part of Speech by them- selves.

For they have not a separate manner ofsigni- Digitized by Google CH. HI ficatum : although they are not devoid of signification.

By such means alone can we clear away the obscurity and errors in which Grammarians and Philosophers have been involved by the corruption of some common words, and the useful Abbreviations of Construction.

Casual, Collective, Effective, Approbative, Discre- tive. Ablative, Presumptive, Abnegative, Completive, Augmentative, Alternative, Hypothetical, Extensive, Pe- riodical, Motival, Conclusive, Explicative, Transitive, Interrogative, Comparative, Diminutive, Preventive, i Adequate Preventive, Adversative, Conditional, Suspen- sivcy Illative, Conductive, Declarative, 8cc.

Quan- quam neutrum ego Disjunctivum appdlo, sed copulativum po- tius negatvcum. You mean, then, by what you have said, flatly to contradict Mr.

Harris's definition of a Conjunction; which he says, is — " a Part of Speech devoid of sig- nification itself, but so formed as to help signification, by making two or more significant sentences to be one significant sentence.

I have the less scruple to do that, because Mr. Har- ris makes no scruple to contradict himself. I believe for I surely have not counted them that he has used the allusion at least twenty times in his Progress of Language; and seems to be always hunting after extremes merely for the sake of introducing tliem.

But they have been so often placed between two stools, that it is no wonder they should at last come to the ground. For what is that, but that f And is, but is?

Doest thou not know what a poet is? Sir Tophas. Why, foole, a poet is as much as one should say — a poet. Fronting Ce galimatias! Vous n'y comprenez done rien?

Non, en verit6. Frontin, Ma foi, ni moi non plus : je vais pourtant vous Tex- pliquer si vous voulez. Comment m'expliquer ce que tu ne comprenJs pas?

Dame, j'ai fait mes 6tudes, moi. VAmanl de lui-mtme. And he himself tamed a partridge that he found somewhere about Carthage to such a degree, that it not only played and fondled with him, but answered him when he spoke to it in a voice dif- ferent from that in which the partridges call one another : but Digitized by Google.

But Mr. Harris has the advantage of a Simile over this gentleman : and though Similes appear with most beauty and propriety in works of imagination, they are frequently found most useful to the authors of philoso- was 80 well bred, that it never made this noise but wlien it was spoken to.

And besides the Pythagoreans, Plato, Aristotle, Empedocles, and Democritus, were of the same opinion. One thing cannot be denied, that their natures may be very much improved by use and instruction, by which they may be made to do things that are really wonderful and far exceeding their natural power of instinct.

And thus far the judgment of the extract can alone be called in question. Now for the further confirmation of this doctripe by their illustrious fisciple.

Be cautious bow you take an assertion so important as this, upon your own authority! Well, He says i What? Locke, that I may have my Tom Thumb again.

For this philosophy gives to my mind as much disgust, though not so much indignation, as your firiend and admirer Lord Mansfield's LAW.

But, not contented with these inconsistencies, which to a less learned man would seem sufficient of all conscience, Mr.

Harris goes further, and adds, that they are a — " kind of middle beings" — he must mean between sig- nification and no signification — " sharing the Attrir butes of both" — i.

Scaliger, Hb. And how signification and no sig- nification can be linked together! Locke, to be so at- tentive an observer of what passed in his own mind, and has written a whole book upon the subject.

In that situation, being natuu. Having at the same time a kind of obscure signifi- cation ; And yet having neither signification nor no signifi- cation; But a middle something between signification and no signification, Sharing the attributes both of signification and no signification ; And linking signification and no signification to- gether.

If others, of a more elegant Taste for Fine Writings are able to receive either pleasure or instruction from rally an acute man, and not a bad writer, it was no wonder that his Essay met with great applause, and was thought to contain wonderful discoveries.

And I must allow that I think it was difficult for any man, without the assistance of books, or of the conversation of men more learned than himself, to go further in the philosophy of mind than he has done.

Harris has opened to us the treasures of Greek philosophy, to consider Mr. Locke still as a standard book of philosophy, would be, to use an ancient comparison, continuing to feed on acorns after corn was discovered.

Hobbes and Mr. Locke in England, and many since their time of less note. I would fain hope, if the indolence and dissipation that prevail so generally in this age would allow me to think so well of it, that Mr.

I am afraid, my good friend, you still carry with you your old humour in politics, though your subject is now different. You speak too sharply for Philoso- phy.

Come, Confess the truth. Are not you against Authority y because Authority is against you? And does not your spleen to Mr.

Harris arise principally from his having taken care to fortify his opinions in a man- ner in which, from your singularity, you cannot?

I hope you know my disposition better. Harris and Dr. Lowth the justice to acknowledge, that the Hermes of the former has been received with universal approbation both at home and abroad ; and has been quoted as undeniable authority on the subject by the learned of all countries.

For which however I can easily account; not by supposing that its doctrine gave any more satisfaction to their minds who quoted it than to mine ; but because, as Judges shelter their knavery by precedents, so do scholars their ignorance by authority : and when they cannot reason, it is safer and less disgraceful to repeat that nonsense at second hand, which they would be ashamed to give originally as their own.

At the same time, I confess, I should disdain to handle any useful truth daintily, sus if I feared lest it should sting me ; and to employ a philosophical in- quiry as a vehicle for interested or cowardly adulation.

I protest to you, my notions of Language were formed before I could account etymologically for any one of the words in question, and before I was in the least acquainted with the opinions of others.

I addressed myself to an inquiry into their opinions with all the diffidence of conscious ignorance; and, so far from spurning authority, was disposed to admit of half an argument from a great name.

So that it is not my fault, if I am forced to carry instead of following the lantern : but at all events it is better than walking in total darkness.

And yet, though I believe I diflFer from all the ac- counts which have hitherto been given of Language, I am not so much without authority as you may ima- gine.

Harris himself and all the Grammarians whom he has, and whom though using their words he has not quoted, are my authorities. Indeed unless, with Mr.

Harris, I had been repeating what others have written, it is impossible I should quote any direct au- thorities for my own manner of explanation.

Fossil AristarckaSf lib. US hear Wilkins, whose industry deserved to have been better employed, and his perseverance better rewarded with discovery ; let us hear what he says.

But until they can be distributed into their proper places, I have so far complied with the Grammars of instituted languages, as to place them here together.

But upon supposal that this theory [viz. And that this is the case with that common theory already re- ceived, need not much be doubted.

Hinc schola Academise novas, quae Acatalepsiam ex professo tenuit, et homines ad sempitemas tenebras damnavit. And in fact, the languages which are com- monly used throughout the world, are much more sim- ple and easy, convenient and philosophical, than Wil- kins's scheme for a real character ; or than any other scheme that has been at any other time imagined or proposed for the purpose.

Locke's dissatisfaction with all the accounts which he had seen, is too well known to need repeti- tion. Sanctius rescued quod particularly from the number of these mysterious Conjunctions, thoygh he left ut amongst them.

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3 Kommentare

  1. Zuluzuru

    Ich weiГџ, dass man)) machen muss)

  2. Narisar

    Nach meiner Meinung irren Sie sich. Schreiben Sie mir in PM, wir werden reden.

  3. Bagrel

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